Asphalt Milling

What is Asphalt Milling?

Asphalt milling is the process of removing a portion of asphalt (anywhere from a couple of inches to a full-depth removal) from an already paved road, driveway, or parking lot. Typically, this will be done when there needs to be repairs made to the asphalt that span across the entirety of the pavement. The asphalt that is removed is then recycled and offered as an option to be used elsewhere in other paving applications.

The importance of asphalt milling is that it keeps the thickness of the asphalt from becoming too high after years of asphalt resurfacing. It also helps to provide our clients with an affordable option for repaving their properties. Because we can remove a small amount of asphalt from the top layer of pavement, it could potentially save on the overall cost of your asphalt paving restoration project because it will not require as much material to be used during the re-paving process.

Why Choose Asphalt Milling?

As mentioned above, this process is great for projects that have large, formed cracks, holes, or unleveled areas because it allows us to remove only the troubled areas and then come back with hot-mix asphalt over the top of what is left remaining. Because we only remove the asphalt down to a certain depth, the overall process of asphalt milling takes less time than it would if we had to tear up the entire project and start over from scratch. This is highly beneficial and cost-saving for our clients because we can get the job done quickly and efficiently. The best part of this process is that it does not sacrifice the aesthetic of your asphalt pavement. In fact, milling your asphalt and pouring new asphalt over the top will leave your property looking brand new!

The other major benefit to this is that it allows the asphalt that has been removed to be used in another project somewhere else. Although the asphalt that has been removed will never be used in a hot-mix asphalt setting, it can be used in smaller applications that do not require as densely packed pavement like farm roads, private roads, or driveways. The fact that this is an environmentally friendly solution makes it a great idea to consider when looking to have your driveway, road, or parking lot repaired.

One of the main reasons behind having your asphalt milled before adding more asphalt on top is that this process allows your paved area to remain at the height that it was when the project was first completed. Asphalt milling will allow you to continue to add pavement to your road, parking lot, or driveway without adding to the overall height of the pavement. This is important because not only do you have the pavement to be concerned about, but with existing pavement, you also must consider the storm water drainage and runoff that was established when the project was first completed. When milling your asphalt, the drainage areas are left undisturbed and once the job is done it will be back to normal and water will drain as it should.

Find Out if Asphalt Milling is Right for You

The process of asphalt milling began several decades ago and since then has become one of the fastest, efficient, and most cost-effective ways for business owners and installation managers to maintain safe, attractive, and healthy pavements. In many cases, milling is a better alternative to complete demolition or other costly pavement removal processes.

If you are unsure if pavement milling is the right solution for your property, Prime Paving & Sealcoating is happy to conduct a free, on-site evaluation. Just give us a call or fill out our contact form. We are pleased to answer any questions or give you a no-cost, no-obligation quote today.

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